Iraqi AK-47 Bullpup Conversion

Introduction

After the fall of Baghdad in 2003 and the dissolving of the Iraqi regular Army, many of the former army personnel and members got involved in armed factions and militias to get back into action against the coalition forces and carry on the fight. They engaged with irregular forces and non-central command, not only because they have lost the head (Saddam Hussein and his staff) but because that is the ideal method of engaging in guerrilla warfare gang-style tactics.

The reason we believe they are Iraqi former army personnel is the existence of Iraqi coat of arms, only nationalists use this slogan, none of the religious background militias use it.

The reason we believe they are Iraqi former army personnel is the existence of Iraqi coat of arms, only nationalists use this slogan, none of the religious background militias use it.

Guerrilla warfare is not meant to make a fast and decisive victory, its generally meant for long-term war where the small groups hit regular armies here and there where they least expect it and cause them losses in lives, equipment and resources (money). In other terms its long-period, attrition war.

It’s well accepted that to make efficient and successful guerrilla attacks, the fighters must be a ghost-like in stealth, low profile and low noise and these require weapons with similar features in which they are small, concealable and suppressed but maintain high effect and efficiency.

No one can ever deny that the most successful assault rifle in the 20th century is the AK-47 in terms of ruggedness, reliability and caliber effectiveness, and Iraq had tons of stockpiles of these rifles.

So the issue they had was: How can we convert the loud AK’s to suit guerilla tactics? And the answer was simple: We will attach suppressors to them! But that’s not the whole story because rifle would still be very long and easily detected so they came up with an idea: Let’s convert them to bullpups.

Conversion

The conversion was really pretty simple, you can even consider it a D.I.Y. craft and you will not be mistaken. Hereby I will show you pictures from a video taken post war time in the early 2000’s.

(please note that this footage was not published on mainstream media and I took it from an Iraqi source so many years ago so kindly don’t be annoyed of the low quality because it’s a really old video and it was the best I could get, also I will publish it on my youtube channel so everybody can watch it, Thanks in advance!)

The first thing to look at here is the butt stock which was removed and replaced by a butt plate, the pistol grip was removed as well.

The first thing to look at here is the butt stock which was removed and replaced by a butt plate, the pistol grip was removed as well.

The butt plate is welded at the rear of the receiver on four holding points thus giving it a stabilized position when firing just like the fixed wooden stock.

The butt plate is welded at the rear of the receiver on four holding points thus giving it a stabilized position when firing just like the fixed wooden stock.

The scope was relayed forward to give a room for the shooter to use it, the receiver’s cover works not as a cheek rest, please note that this is intended only for right handed shooters otherwise the ejection port will be stuck right to your neck if you shot it with the left hand.

The scope was moved forward to give a room for the shooter to use it, the receiver’s cover works as a cheek rest, please note that this is intended only for right-handed shooters otherwise the ejection port will be stuck right to your neck if you shot it with the left hand.

 A dummy trigger with external housing was welded to the receiver right in front of the magazine, this dummy trigger isn’t spring tensioned and it’s linked to the real operating trigger by a metal U-shaped rod and the reason it is wide U-shaped is to connect the two triggers while giving enough space and easier access for the magazine to load and sit in the magazine well, the magazine itself is used as a handgrip instead of the original removed pistol grip in the rear.

 A dummy trigger with external housing was welded to the receiver right in front of the magazine, this dummy trigger isn’t spring tensioned; it’s linked to the real operating trigger by a metal U-shaped rod and the reason it is wide U-shaped is to connect the two triggers while giving enough space and easier access for the magazine to load and sit in the magazine well, the magazine itself is used as a handgrip instead of the original removed pistol grip in the rear.

Front trigger

Front trigger

The rod rib is placed behind the front trigger to give more comfort for the shooter’s forefinger and it’s placed in front of the rear trigger for simultaneous action, the U-shape rod itself is connected from the left side since the rifle is for right handed users only.

The rod rib is placed behind the front trigger to give more comfort for the shooter’s forefinger and it’s placed in front of the rear trigger for simultaneous action, the U-shape rod itself is connected from the left side since the rifle is for right-handed users only.

A side view of the rifle- sorry about the bad quality

A side view of the rifle- sorry about the bad quality

Silencers

The footage also shows silencer trials on a bolt action rifle; probably a CZ hunting rifle.  There are some scenes in the video showing the manufacturing of a large number of silencers and they seem they work very well with low noise (I wasn’t able to tell if that really are really that effective or because of the quality of the video; there are no sound meter tests).

A bolt action rifle fitted with a suppressor in trials.

A bolt action rifle fitted with a suppressor in trials.

Quality control guy calibrating the suppressors.

Quality control guy calibrating the suppressors.

Doing the paint job on suppressors.

Doing the paint job on suppressors.

Local made suppressors in stock.

Local made suppressors in stock.

And now since it’s the simplest and maybe the goofiest DIY bullpup conversion, would you do it for your AK-47 sporting rifle?

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Originally posted on The Firearm Blog